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  Canada Immigration Forum > About Canada > Jobs > Out-of-country (current) address hindering employer's interest?
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Out-of-country (current) address hindering employer's interest?




Here's my situation: My CV has my current (Philadelphia, PA, US) address and phone number in it. Is this a reason why I haven't been getting many (if any at all) calls back from prospective employers in Canada? If so, what should I do? Wait until I'm in Canada to start looking for employment? I had that as my original plan, but I heard that you can't get any work visa unless you already have been hired for the position in question.

To anyone who can give me insight & tips as to what to do, thanks very much for your time...


 
Last edited by: adam917 on 10-01-05 03:09:43
adam917

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Member since: Oct 04
Posts: 54
Location: North America

Post ID: 36389 10-01-05 03:09:11
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pratickm
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Posts: 2831
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Quote:
Orginally posted by adam917
Here's my situation: My CV has my current (Philadelphia, PA, US) address and phone number in it. Is this a reason why I haven't been getting many (if any at all) calls back from prospective employers in Canada?


Yes, that is very likely.
Canadian employers and recruiters often get a "sales pitch" from prospective immigrants in the US, but they have no way of knowing whether the person is serious about moving or not.
Several recruiters have told me that they have been burnt by Canadian PRs living in the US who were looking for jobs in Canada.
They went thru the entire recruitment process and then either disappeared or refused the offers.

Therefore, a lot of time, when the staffing agencies or HR people look at a US address, it puts them off.

Another reason is that a lot of the jobs on the job sites are not real.
They are mostly staffing or headhunting companies fishing for resumes to build their data bank.
They have no intention of calling applicants back in the first place.

As for companies posting jobs on websites, often those jobs are filled via internal references or via staffing agencies.
Sometimes jobs are posted to fulfill some legal or administrative requirements to.
Therefore, on average, only about 5% - 8% of the jobs posted online are real jobs.

Quote:
If so, what should I do? Wait until I'm in Canada to start looking for employment?

You will stand a better chance that way.
You can go on looking even now, but be prepared that you may not get calls or they will not show interest.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
"Mah deah, there is much more money to be made in the destruction of civilization than in building it up."

-- Rhett Butler in "Gone with the Wind"

 
Post ID: 36407 10-01-05 10:37:20
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adam917
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Member since: Oct 04




Posts: 54
Location: North America


Quote:
Orginally posted by pratickm

Quote:
Orginally posted by adam917
Here's my situation: My CV has my current (Philadelphia, PA, US) address and phone number in it. Is this a reason why I haven't been getting many (if any at all) calls back from prospective employers in Canada?


Yes, that is very likely.
Canadian employers and recruiters often get a "sales pitch" from prospective immigrants in the US, but they have no way of knowing whether the person is serious about moving or not.
Several recruiters have told me that they have been burnt by Canadian PRs living in the US who were looking for jobs in Canada.
They went thru the entire recruitment process and then either disappeared or refused the offers.

Therefore, a lot of time, when the staffing agencies or HR people look at a US address, it puts them off.

Another reason is that a lot of the jobs on the job sites are not real.
They are mostly staffing or headhunting companies fishing for resumes to build their data bank.
They have no intention of calling applicants back in the first place.

As for companies posting jobs on websites, often those jobs are filled via internal references or via staffing agencies.
Sometimes jobs are posted to fulfill some legal or administrative requirements to.
Therefore, on average, only about 5% - 8% of the jobs posted online are real jobs.

Quote:
If so, what should I do? Wait until I'm in Canada to start looking for employment?

You will stand a better chance that way.
You can go on looking even now, but be prepared that you may not get calls or they will not show interest.


Thank you _so_ much for such an informative post! I kinda figured that many jobs listed on the job data bases weren't real -- especially after receiving an e-mail starting off like (with following mail-merge variables in place!): '[today] Hello [FirstName] [LastName]...'!

OK, I forgot to add this question in, even though I know the answer's highly variable: What would be a sensible amount of money to bring into Canada during 'landing'? What would be the minimum that would be suggested? Thanks very much...


 
Last edited by: adam917 on 10-01-05 23:51:28
Post ID: 36451 10-01-05 23:45:29
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pratickm
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Member since: Feb 04




Posts: 2831
Location: Toronto


Quote:
Orginally posted by adam917
OK, I forgot to add this question in, even though I know the answer's highly variable: What would be a sensible amount of money to bring into Canada during 'landing'? What would be the minimum that would be suggested? Thanks very much...

The legal minimum is the amount shown on CIC's web site depending on the size of your family.
However, in most cases, you want to bring more than the required minimum.

The amount depends on several factors --

1. Number of dependent family members

2. The lifestyle you want after landing in Canada (do you want to start off buying the stuff you want with your settlement funds, or want to wait and buy with Canadian income after getting a job).

3. How you rate your chances of getting a good, full-time job in your field

Be prepared for the "price shock" especially since you are moving from the US.
You will find most things more expensive north of the border, even after adjusting for the exchange rate.
Some of the things might be cheaper, but in general try to bring as much stuff as you can - avoid buying things here during the first few months, or at least till you get a job.

Also, make sure that some of the funds you have are easily convertible, like cash or traveller's checks.
This topic comes up very frequently in discussions, so please search the archives for detailed options.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
"Mah deah, there is much more money to be made in the destruction of civilization than in building it up."

-- Rhett Butler in "Gone with the Wind"

 
Post ID: 36453 11-01-05 00:04:44
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adam917
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Member since: Oct 04




Posts: 54
Location: North America


Quote:
Orginally posted by pratickm

Quote:
Orginally posted by adam917
OK, I forgot to add this question in, even though I know the answer's highly variable: What would be a sensible amount of money to bring into Canada during 'landing'? What would be the minimum that would be suggested? Thanks very much...

The legal minimum is the amount shown on CIC's web site depending on the size of your family.
However, in most cases, you want to bring more than the required minimum.

The amount depends on several factors --

1. Number of dependent family members

2. The lifestyle you want after landing in Canada (do you want to start off buying the stuff you want with your settlement funds, or want to wait and buy with Canadian income after getting a job).

3. How you rate your chances of getting a good, full-time job in your field

Be prepared for the "price shock" especially since you are moving from the US.
You will find most things more expensive north of the border, even after adjusting for the exchange rate.
Some of the things might be cheaper, but in general try to bring as much stuff as you can - avoid buying things here during the first few months, or at least till you get a job.

Also, make sure that some of the funds you have are easily convertible, like cash or traveller's checks.
This topic comes up very frequently in discussions, so please search the archives for detailed options.


I'm coming alone.

I've heard that fuel prices are at least twice as high as in the US, however that wobn't affect me as I don't drive.

Most of what I own (like electronics, etc.) is all portable (and international: 100--240 V, 50/60 Hz), so I can move it easily. I won't be (able to) bring(ing) my PC, as it's just too big and outdated (Intel Celeron, 800 MHz).

My funds will be cash or on my credit/debit card, so exchanging shouldn't be too difficult. I will probably prefer waiting until I get Canadian income before buying stuff (do you mean hardware, like PC stuff?).

Another question: When I fill out forms for job openings, etc., what address do I use in my first days in Canada? I will not have a work visa upon arrival for the very first time, so what's the best solution for course of events upon arrival?

Thanks very much...


 
Post ID: 36457 11-01-05 00:54:03
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pratickm
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Member since: Feb 04




Posts: 2831
Location: Toronto


Quote:
Orginally posted by adam917
My funds will be cash or on my credit/debit card, so exchanging shouldn't be too difficult.


Just make sure there are no hidden fees on your cards for foreign currency transactions.
Some banks charge as much as 4% per transaction.

Quote:
Another question: When I fill out forms for job openings, etc., what address do I use in my first days in Canada? I will not have a work visa upon arrival for the very first time, so what's the best solution for course of events upon arrival?
Don't you have PR?
Then how are you coming to Canada?
I was assuming you are coming with PR.

In either case, you need some sort of address when you come.
Where are you going to stay?
Fix-up some place and use that address.
Or at least get a Mailbox somewhere.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
"Mah deah, there is much more money to be made in the destruction of civilization than in building it up."

-- Rhett Butler in "Gone with the Wind"

 
Post ID: 36485 11-01-05 10:33:44
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adam917
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Member since: Oct 04




Posts: 54
Location: North America


Quote:
Orginally posted by pratickm

Quote:
Orginally posted by adam917
My funds will be cash or on my credit/debit card, so exchanging shouldn't be too difficult.


Just make sure there are no hidden fees on your cards for foreign currency transactions.
Some banks charge as much as 4% per transaction.

Quote:
Another question: When I fill out forms for job openings, etc., what address do I use in my first days in Canada? I will not have a work visa upon arrival for the very first time, so what's the best solution for course of events upon arrival?
Don't you have PR?
Then how are you coming to Canada?
I was assuming you are coming with PR.

In either case, you need some sort of address when you come.
Where are you going to stay?
Fix-up some place and use that address.
Or at least get a Mailbox somewhere.


Do you mean 'Permanent Resident card' or something else by 'PR'? If you're assumeing that I have the card, I don't. I never set foot in Canada yet.


 
Post ID: 36565 11-01-05 23:19:02
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pratickm
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Member since: Feb 04




Posts: 2831
Location: Toronto


Quote:
Orginally posted by adam917
Do you mean 'Permanent Resident card' or something else by 'PR'? If you're assumeing that I have the card, I don't. I never set foot in Canada yet.

I meant the Permanent Resident visa - a PR approval.
The card is not important because it is only needed when you travel out of the country - it is not needed to apply for a job.
If you have a PR visa approved and stamped on your passport, then all you have to do is land in Canada and start applying for jobs.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
"Mah deah, there is much more money to be made in the destruction of civilization than in building it up."

-- Rhett Butler in "Gone with the Wind"

 
Post ID: 36573 12-01-05 00:31:15
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adam917
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Member since: Oct 04




Posts: 54
Location: North America


Quote:
Orginally posted by pratickmI meant the Permanent Resident visa - a PR approval.
The card is not important because it is only needed when you travel out of the country - it is not needed to apply for a job.
If you have a PR visa approved and stamped on your passport, then all you have to do is land in Canada and start applying for jobs.


What does it take to get this visa? Any special requirements?


 
Post ID: 36644 12-01-05 15:27:45
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pratickm
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Member since: Feb 04




Posts: 2831
Location: Toronto


Quote:
Orginally posted by adam917
What does it take to get this visa? Any special requirements?

Maybe you should tell us a bit more about yourself.
While responding, I have been assuming that you have attained a PR and are now planning to land in Canada, therefore looking for jobs.

Apparently, my assumptions are wrong.

So you should tell us where you live, what is your citizenship country (that will determine whether you need a visa to come to Canada or not), why you are interested in looking for a job in Canada, and so on.

Basically, if you simply want to work here for a while, you should get a work permit, and if you want to live here long-term, then you should apply for a PR.
You can also do both - get a work permit, live and work here for a few years and then decide whether you want to apply for a PR or not.

A starting point for all these issues is the CIC website at:
http://www.cic.gc.ca

-----------------------------------------------------------------
"Mah deah, there is much more money to be made in the destruction of civilization than in building it up."

-- Rhett Butler in "Gone with the Wind"

 
Last edited by: pratickm on 12-01-05 15:33:59
Post ID: 36649 12-01-05 15:33:36
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